Manitoba Daily

Saturday, February 24, 2024

Manitoba farmers are appreciating the recent spell of dry weather

Farmers in Manitoba are appreciating the recent dry spell.

Key Takeaways:

  • Manitoba farmers are delighted that the never-ending rain has given way to warm weather.
  • According to Froese of 680 CJOB, good weather will be crucial, not just shortly, but also during harvest and into early November.
  • April has been the wettest on record. 303.6 mm of rain fell in three months. Quinlan estimates that 115.5 mm of rain fell on average over that time.

Farmers in Manitoba are relieved that the unending rain has been replaced with warm weather.

The rain postponed the sowing season for many farmers in the province’s southern regions.

“By this time (early June), we should have roughly 96 percent of the crop planted.” Dane Froese of Manitoba Agriculture remarked, “That’s our five-year average.” “Right now, we’re around 65 percent of the way into the ground.” Since we started, we’ve been roughly a month late,” he noted.

Fields have dried out due to the dry weather, and nearby rivers, lakes, and streams have gradually receded from the fields.

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According to Froese of 680 CJOB, good weather will be critical not only in the immediate future but also during harvest and into early November.

According to Global News Meteorologist Peter Quinlan, there was 299.2 mm of precipitation in March, April, and May, compared to 111.2 mm on average. This April is the second wettest on record. Over three months, 303.6 mm of rain fell. According to Quinlan, 115.5 mm of rain falls on average during that period.

Farmers in Manitoba are appreciating the recent dry spell.
Farmers in Manitoba are appreciating the recent dry spell. Image from CBC News

Despite this, Froese expressed optimism among producers.

“It’s the nature of the work,” says the narrator. “I don’t know of any other profession where you put in half a million dollars in the spring and hope to collect half a million and a little more in the fall,” he added.

“Knowing you can’t do anything about it could make you feel better.” It is not up to us, and you must do your best. “Sometimes you have to tell yourself, ‘There’s always next year,’ and keep trying,” Froese explained.

Source: Global News

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