Manitoba Daily

Tuesday, January 31, 2023

First Nations groups in Juno Beach are concerned about condo development

First Nations groups in Juno Beach are concerned about condo construction.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Anishinabek Nation and the Chiefs Veterans Council have expressed their displeasure with the approval of condo construction in Juno Beach.
  • According to the Anishinabek Nation, Juno Beach is vital to its people, Indigenous nations, and Canadians.

Concerns have been raised by the Anishinabek Nation and the Chiefs Veterans Council concerning the approval of condo construction in Juno Beach.

The Anishinabek Nation, representing 39 First Nations in Ontario, raised its concerns in a news release on Wednesday, stressing that the proposed development would be just a few meters from the Canadian Memorial at the D-Day landing site in France.

According to Reg Niganobe, Grand Council Chief of the Anishinabek Nation, construction could begin as early as September.

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He went on to say that the group is pleading with the government to collaborate with its French equivalent to take “urgent intervention steps” in light of the situation.

“We must examine the effects of this development on the fallen Veterans, their families, and the shared historical value this location holds for both of our countries,” Niganobe added.

Many of the Anishinabek Nation’s inhabitants fought in the Canadian military during WWII, with more than 14,000 Canadian soldiers landing in France on D-Day, according to the Anishinabek Nation.

First Nations groups in Juno Beach are concerned about condo construction.
First Nations groups in Juno Beach are concerned about condo construction. Image from iHeartRadio

According to Melvin Hardy, the Anishinabek Nation’s Chief of the Northern Superior Regional Grand Council, Veterans have remarked that protecting these grounds is a religious and traditional responsibility.

Hardy, the head of the Chiefs Veterans Committee, said, “We must assure the continued honoring of their memory and care for the area in which this incident occurred.”

“It is critical to honoring the noble contributions of WWII veterans and all those who perished in this heinous conflict.”

Juno Beach is vital to its people, Indigenous nations, and Canadians, according to the Anishinabek Nation.

Source: CTV News

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