Manitoba Daily

As emergency rooms overflow, Manitoba is not ruling out military assistance

Manitoba is not ruling out military assistance as emergency rooms are overcrowded.

Key takeaways:

  • As it deals with staff shortages, overcrowding, and, in some cases, terrorism, the Manitoba government may seek military aid.
  • The current situation in emergency departments, according to the Manitoba Nurses’ Union, is leading nurses to burn out and leave their jobs.
  • In a statement to CTV News, Shared Health claimed that current wait times are an issue for everyone in the healthcare system.

The Manitoba government may seek military assistance as it grapples with personnel shortages, overcrowding, and, in certain circumstances, temporary emergency department closures.

The healthcare system is experiencing a bottleneck due to a lack of personnel. Premier Heather Stefanson isn’t ruled out asking for military assistance because the crisis is acute.

“We will resume assessing the situation through the [Emergency Management Office], and if action is required, we will take it,” Stefanson said at a press conference on Tuesday.

According to the Manitoba Nurses’ Union, the current scenario in emergency rooms is causing nurses to burn out and leave their positions. According to the report, patients are being placed in break rooms, including hallways in some situations, to assist clear the emergency room.

Also read: Whiteshell cottagers and residents are fighting rising floods

Darlene Jackson, the union’s president, stated, “We spend every day apologizing.” “We apologize to patients for not being able to respond to them as promptly as they should because adding more patients does not mean adding more nurses.”

According to Jackson, Manitoba has around 2,500 job openings, affecting all parts of the province.

Due to a staffing shortage, Pine Falls Health Complex had to temporarily close its emergency department on Friday.

Audrey Gordon, the Minister of Health, stated that resolving the problem is a major priority.

“We’re committed to working with those communities to reopen and staff their emergency departments,” Gordon added.

She stated that the government is striving to recruit, train, and retain more nurses, as well as consulting with frontline health officials to find further solutions.

Manitoba is not ruling out military assistance as emergency rooms are overcrowded.
Manitoba is not ruling out military assistance as emergency rooms are overcrowded. Image from CBC News

“We recognize that the system is under tremendous strain right now, and we’re all gathered around a table of solutions to discuss how we might relieve those strains,” she said.

Shared Health said in a statement to CTV News that existing wait times are a problem for everyone in the healthcare system.

According to the report, patients who require urgent care are still seen immediately, and all patients are triaged when they arrive.

Ambulances are transporting lower-acuity patients to urgent care centers rather than emergency rooms, according to the health provider, and a physician-in-triage style of treatment is being used to assist alleviate the burden.

While these interim measures work to alleviate the burden, the premier says the province keeps an eye on the situation to determine whether more assistance is required.

“It’s accessed daily, hour-by-hour basis across our entire system. We’ll keep working closely with Shared Health to make sure we can overcome some of these obstacles, “Stefanson remarked.

Source: CTV News

Get Canada and Manitoba’s top News, Market news, and other worldwide news only on Manitoba Daily.

Show More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.