Manitoba Daily

Friday, January 28, 2022

The symptoms of Omicron may differ from those of other COVID-19 variants

Omicron symptoms might differ from those other COVID-19 variants

Key takeaways:

  • Cold-like symptoms are more common in those infected with the novel coronavirus’s Omicron variant.
  • Barrett cited data from Denmark, where hospitalization rates appear to be comparable to other strains of the virus.

According to preliminary data from the United Kingdom, cold-like symptoms are more common among those infected with the Omicron variant of the novel coronavirus.

The top five symptoms for Omicron were runny nose, headache, fatigue, sneezing, and sore throat, according to the ZOE COVID Symptoms Study, which tracks symptoms recorded from participants using a smartphone app.

Based on over 52,000 COVID-19 tests, the data was collected between Dec. 3 and 10 in London, where Omicron has emerged as the dominant strain.

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Fever, cough, and loss of smell were less common than with other strains of the virus. According to the ZOE study, only half of those with Omicron had these three “classic symptoms,” according to the ZOE study.

Symptoms such as loss of appetite and brain fog were also common.

“Hopefully, people are now aware of the cold-like symptoms that appear to be the most common symptom of Omicron. These are the changes that will help to slow the virus’s spread, “Tim Spector, the ZOE’s lead scientist, said in a news release on Thursday.

These findings are also in line with preliminary findings from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which looked at 43 Omicron cases between December 1 and December 8. According to the CDC, the most common symptoms among the cohort, three-quarters fully vaccinated, were cough, fatigue, congestion, or runny nose.

Dr. Angelique Coetzee, the chair of the South African Medical Association and the first doctor to detect the Omicron variant has said that fatigue, along with headaches, body aches, and a “scratchy” throat, are among the most common symptoms she’s seen.

Omicron symptoms might differ from those other COVID-19 variants
Omicron symptoms might differ from those other COVID-19 variants. Image from NBC Chicago

“The majority of them see minor symptoms, and none of them have admitted patients to surgeries thus far. We’ve been able to treat these patients at home with caution. “In late November, she told Reuters.

According to a preliminary study conducted by South African researchers, the risk of hospitalization for the Omicron variant was 29 percent lower after adjusting for vaccination status when compared to the first wave of the virus in mid-2020.

On the other hand, experts say it’s too early to say whether Omicron will be milder in Canada.

“The long and short of it is that some country data suggests that this is a milder form of the disease. Other country data contradicts this, “Dr. Lisa Barrett, an infectious diseases expert at Dalhousie University, told CTV News Channel on Saturday.

Barrett cited data from Denmark, where hospitalization rates appear to be comparable to other strains of the virus.

Based on data collected in England between November 29 and December 11, a preliminary U.K. study published on Thursday found “no evidence (for both risk of hospitalization attendance and symptom status) of Omicron having different severity from Delta.”

“Even if you’re not in the hospital,” Barrett said, “I think businesses and other people should know that you can be pretty sick and not go to the hospital.”

Source: CTV News

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