Manitoba Daily

Experts advise that detecting COVID-19 with a single rapid test may be insufficient

COVID-19 may not be detected by a single quick test, according to experts.

Key Takeaways:

  • The most common way Manitobans test for COVID-19 is using COVID-19 rapid testing, but some experts consider that one test is insufficient.
  • According to Julie Lajoie, the first rapid test, an immunology expert at the University of Manitoba, may not be positive.
  • According to Carr, another difficulty with the strains is the efficacy of vaccines and whether or not therapies would work.

COVID-19 fast tests are the most common way Manitobans test for COVID-19, but some experts believe that one test is insufficient.

On Friday, Roger De Melo said he experienced COVID-19 symptoms, but the rapid test returned negative.

In an interview with CTV News, De Melo said, “I thought it could be COVID, but the fact that I was returning negatives – I’m going OK.” He added that he tested the next day again.

“By Saturday, I’d developed a cough, and I figured, ‘No, that’s surely COVID.'”

Also read: The Manitoba storm is passed, but there is more snow on the way

He took the third test on Sunday, which came back positive.

Julie Lajoie, an immunology expert at the University of Manitoba, believes the first quick test may not be positive.

“The trouble with Omicron right now is that they’ll be sick for one or two days, they’ll test negative, and they’ll assume, ‘OK, it’s another virus because there are so many other viruses in the air right now,” Lajoie said during an interview with CTV News. “However, we now need to test a little more frequently.”

“The difficulty with quick tests and they’re very different from the gold standard PCR that goes to the lab,” said Cynthia Carr, founder of EPI Research.

According to Carr, the ability of quick tests to identify COVID-19 is dependent on the strain.

COVID-19 may not be detected by a single quick test, according to experts.
COVID-19 may not be detected by a single quick test, according to experts. Image from CBC News

“With Omicron, the average is around 40%.” “Four out of ten tests correctly identify that person as having the virus,” she said. “As a result, it must not be relied upon solely, and you should do it more than once.”

Another issue with the strains, according to Carr, is the effectiveness of immunizations and whether or not therapies would work.

According to Lajoie, in comparison to prior strains, Omicron appears to be more prevalent in the upper respiratory tract. When testing, she recommends swabbing the neck, cheeks, and nose.

“Rapid tests are extremely important tools; all we have to do now is change how we utilize them with Omicron,” Lajoie added.

To make sure you’re not COVID-19 positive, Lajoie recommends testing every 24 hours for three days.

Source: CTV News

Get Canada and Manitoba’s top News, Market news, and other worldwide news only on Manitoba Daily.

Show More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.